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SSI eligibility

The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program makes payments to people with low income over the age of 65 or who are blind or have a disability. There is no age minimum to receiving benefits if you are blind or have a disability. The SSI program is administered by the Social Security Administration but is separate from Social Security payments. Disabilities may be incurred by any means, including by personal injury accident.

Blindness is defined as central vision of 20/200 or less with the use of a corrective lens in the better eye. Blindness is also defined as a visual field limitation of 20 degrees or less in the stronger eye.

Disability for a minor means a medically determinable physical or mental impairment that results in marked and severe functional limitations; and can be expected to result in death; or has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months.

Disability for an adult means a medically determinable physical or mental impairment that results in results in the inability to do any Substantial Gainful Activity; and can be expected to result in death; or has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months. Substantially gainful activity is work performed for pay or profit; work of nature that is generally performed for pay or profit; or work intended for profit whether or not a profit is realized.

Eligibility is determined also by income. Applicants for SSI must have low or limited income. Income includes money earned from work or money received from other sources: such as Social Security benefits; unemployment benefits; workers compensation; friends or family. The applicant must also have limited resources to qualify. Resources that are considered are cash; bank accounts; real or personal property; or any other item that can be converted to cash.

An applicant for SSI must be a citizen of national of the United States or be a qualified alien defined by the department of homeland security. A qualified alien is one who is either: lawfully admitted permanent resident; conditional entry under Section 203(a)(7) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) prior to 1980; Paroled into the U.S. under Section 212(d)(5) of the INA for a period of at least one year; a refugee admitted to the U.S. under Section 207 of the INA; an alien who was granted asylum under Section 208 of the INA; an alien of whom deportation is being withheld under Section 243(h) of the INA prior to April 1, 1997; or removal is being withheld under Section 241(b)(3) of the INA; or a Cuban or Haitian entrant under Section 501(e) of the Refugee Education Assistance Act of 1980 or in a status that is to be treated as a "Cuban/Haitian entrant" for SSI purposes.

If you believe you may have a case for SSI, contact our office and speak with an attorney for free today.

Categories: SSI eligibility

The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.

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